Hi 😀 yes I have a question, just starting this Keto diet, so we’re very new at this but my boyfriend had a heart attack 8 years ago so we need to be very careful to not get to high on fat with him. Can he still benefit from this diet. His Doctor said he needs to get some of his weight off he is having a hard time breathing. The Doctor said a low carb diet. But I, we would like to try the Keto diet.
Wondering how u eat veggies without going over your carbs n how do you get all the fats in. I’ve put the requirements into my fitness pal(macros) but I’m still not losing. Mine are set at 5% carbs 25% protein n 70% fats. Don’t know what I’m doing wrong. I’m allergic to gluten some dairy n eggs. Any help would be great so I can start losing instead of gaining
Anticonvulsants suppress epileptic seizures, but they neither cure nor prevent the development of seizure susceptibility. The development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis) is a process that is poorly understood. A few anticonvulsants (valproate, levetiracetam and benzodiazepines) have shown antiepileptogenic properties in animal models of epileptogenesis. However, no anticonvulsant has ever achieved this in a clinical trial in humans. The ketogenic diet has been found to have antiepileptogenic properties in rats.[56]

What a great post. I thought i would add about the selection of food you eat on keto and that everyone is different. Some food gives you energy and some doesnt, this varies person to person. I started and quit keto 3 times before i managed to find my balance. The first few times it made be poorly, from the shock of diet change. However, you can wean yourself into the diet which i did the last time when i had the most success.
Anticonvulsants suppress epileptic seizures, but they neither cure nor prevent the development of seizure susceptibility. The development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis) is a process that is poorly understood. A few anticonvulsants (valproate, levetiracetam and benzodiazepines) have shown antiepileptogenic properties in animal models of epileptogenesis. However, no anticonvulsant has ever achieved this in a clinical trial in humans. The ketogenic diet has been found to have antiepileptogenic properties in rats.[56]

Among the best products we’ve seen is called Boost. The formula contains more than 10 clinically-tested ingredients – tribulus terrestris, fenugreek, digestive enzymes, coleus foskohlii, milk thistle, alpha lipoic acid, eurycoma longifolia, horny goat weed and black pepper extract. Research shows the ingredients help boost energy levels, support lean muscle growth, and helps boost vitality.

if you are not eating organic or wild red and other meats and also ensuring they’ve not been vaccinated with “the usual” poisons that is so ‘mainstream’ now and putting all of humanity at risk, you’re putting yourself and even your offspring at huge risk! Any benefit you may want to derive from following a ketogenic or any diet is pointless in light of what science has known and proven over 20 years ago and which mainstream health care professionals and providers are, respectfully, ignorant of (that’s what they’ve been led to believe by those invested in pharma and their regulatory bodies). If you don’t believe me, watch “The Truth About Vaccines” with an open mind. You won’t regret it. (I have absolutely no investment in nor connection to the producers of that docu~series, I have simply had my “mind blown” by the facts … I’ve been a holistic health practitioner and student for over 40 years so I’m not “convinced” easily.

Since this is my full-time job, donations really help me keep afloat and allow me to post as much to the website as I do. While I do really appreciate any donation you want to give, you can enter $0 in the amount given to download it for free! I’ve added in $5 as the suggested price. I think that’s a very fair price considering other websites are charging in the hundreds of dollars and I’ve seen what they are like on the inside.
A survey in 2005 of 88 paediatric neurologists in the US found that 36% regularly prescribed the diet after three or more drugs had failed, 24% occasionally prescribed the diet as a last resort, 24% had only prescribed the diet in a few rare cases, and 16% had never prescribed the diet. Several possible explanations exist for this gap between evidence and clinical practice.[34] One major factor may be the lack of adequately trained dietitians who are needed to administer a ketogenic diet programme.[31]
A systematic review in 2018 looked at 16 studies on the ketogenic diet in adults. It concluded that the treatment was becoming more popular for that group of patients, that the efficacy in adults was similar to children, the side effects relatively mild. However, many patients gave up with the diet, for various reasons, and the quality of evidence was inferior to studies on children. Health issues include high levels of low-density lipoprotein, high total cholesterol, and weight loss.[24]
Ketosis takes some time to get into – about two weeks of low carb eating is required for the initial adaptation. During this time there will be bouts of sluggishness, fatigue, headaches, and some gastrointestinal issues as you adapt, often referred to as “keto flu“. Proper electrolyte intake will correct most of these issues. In addition, the “diet” aspect of this ketogenic diet plan – that is, the caloric restriction – shouldn’t be worried about. Weight loss will come as your body regulates appetite as it the addiction to sugar and processed food lessens, so restricting calories during the initial two weeks isn’t recommended.
Hi Cyn, The numbers are general guidelines but will vary depending on many factors, such as activity level, insulin resistance, weight and more. There is no single magic number, just conventional recommendations that are a good starting point. I will have a macro calculator coming soon that will help determine what is best for each person, but even then it’s an approximation. The only way to know for sure is to test. If keto is your goal, it’s usually best to start lower and then see if you can stay in ketosis when increasing.

if you are not eating organic or wild red and other meats and also ensuring they’ve not been vaccinated with “the usual” poisons that is so ‘mainstream’ now and putting all of humanity at risk, you’re putting yourself and even your offspring at huge risk! Any benefit you may want to derive from following a ketogenic or any diet is pointless in light of what science has known and proven over 20 years ago and which mainstream health care professionals and providers are, respectfully, ignorant of (that’s what they’ve been led to believe by those invested in pharma and their regulatory bodies). If you don’t believe me, watch “The Truth About Vaccines” with an open mind. You won’t regret it. (I have absolutely no investment in nor connection to the producers of that docu~series, I have simply had my “mind blown” by the facts … I’ve been a holistic health practitioner and student for over 40 years so I’m not “convinced” easily.

On a ketogenic diet, you’re generally eating a diet that’s high in fat (roughly 70 percent of your total calories come from fat), moderate in protein (about 20 percent of your calories), and low in carbohydrate (about 5 percent of calories). By limiting carbohydrates (to usually less than 45 grams for the average person), your body lacks the glucose (from carbs) that it normally uses for energy, so it eventually switches over to burning fat as its primary fuel source instead; through a metabolic process called ketosis, the liver converts the fat into fragments of fatty acids called ketones, which power the brain and other organs and tissues.
Try Googling “TDEE Calculator”. Once you plug in your stats, the site will calculate your total daily energy expenditure. This is a useful guide in determining how many calories to eat. From there, if you are trying to lose weight, just reduce your caloric intake, increase your expenditure (through exercising more), or use a combination of the two.
The first modern study of fasting as a treatment for epilepsy was in France in 1911.[12] Twenty epilepsy patients of all ages were "detoxified" by consuming a low-calorie vegetarian diet, combined with periods of fasting and purging. Two benefited enormously, but most failed to maintain compliance with the imposed restrictions. The diet improved the patients' mental capabilities, in contrast to their medication, potassium bromide, which dulled the mind.[13]
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