Because some cancer cells are inefficient in processing ketone bodies for energy, the ketogenic diet has also been suggested as a treatment for cancer.[59][60] A 2018 review looked at the evidence from preclinical and clinical studies of ketogenic diets in cancer therapy. The clinical studies in humans are typically very small, with some providing weak evidence for anti-tumour effect, particularly for glioblastoma, but in other cancers and studies, no anti-tumour effect was seen. Taken together, results from preclinical studies, albeit sometimes contradictory, tend to support an anti-tumor effect rather than a pro-tumor effect of the KD for most solid cancers.[61]
The most complaints about the Kinobody program is that the information that the program gives is not something that you can’t find out on your own. People also complained about not being able to access the program on their mobile devices. Other complaints have been that the fasting was just too much for long periods of times and not enough of the exercises.

A systematic review in 2018 looked at 16 studies on the ketogenic diet in adults. It concluded that the treatment was becoming more popular for that group of patients, that the efficacy in adults was similar to children, the side effects relatively mild. However, many patients gave up with the diet, for various reasons, and the quality of evidence was inferior to studies on children. Health issues include high levels of low-density lipoprotein, high total cholesterol, and weight loss.[24]
However, Kinobody also recommends that you try a “reverse pyramid” workout regimen. In this regimen, you start by doing a short set with the highest weight possible, and then you gradually work your way down to lighter weights and longer sets. Also, you can try another variant of the pyramid workout called the “triangle.” In this pyramid workout variant, you include some warmup sets, but these sets are not included in the counting structure of your pyramid workout.
Let me start by saying I don’t work for Greg or Kinobody. Despite his douche bag filled videos and ridiculous demeanor, Greg’s Greek God Kinobody program has worked for me. Once you pay, you get the online program (which is pretty simple), access to the forum (can see tons of inspiring, crazy transformations and get quality advice from the other 10,000 plus users on the forum) and of course, loads of advertisements on his other products. I’d give it 4.5 starts if I could-it’s a little unorganized and the constant barrage of advertising is annoying but the results are hard to argue with. In the end, any program comes down to what you put into it. Nice thing about his stuff is the time commitment isn’t as intense as insanity, p90x, etc. and you get to eat what you want, just in moderation and at certain times of the day.
For patients who benefit, half achieve a seizure reduction within five days (if the diet starts with an initial fast of one to two days), three-quarters achieve a reduction within two weeks, and 90% achieve a reduction within 23 days. If the diet does not begin with a fast, the time for half of the patients to achieve an improvement is longer (two weeks), but the long-term seizure reduction rates are unaffected.[44] Parents are encouraged to persist with the diet for at least three months before any final consideration is made regarding efficacy.[9]
"Plenty of people jump right in, thinking all they have to do is cut carbs and increase fat. All of a sudden, they hit a wall and get 'keto flu.' They feel tired, lethargic, and experience headaches," Wittrock says. "The primary reason they get these symptoms is lack of the three primary electrolytes: sodium, potassium, and magnesium. If you're deficient in any of these, you'll suffer mentally and physically. This is the single biggest reason people fail on the keto diet."
Since the Kinobody workout mainly consists of dumbbell workouts and fasting, this company doesn’t really provide anything new or groundbreaking in the world of at-home fitness. The unique factor that Kinobody does contribute, however, is a feeling of belonging in an all-encompassing fitness regimen that offers multiple ways to feel fit and in control.
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