Let me start by saying I don’t work for Greg or Kinobody. Despite his douche bag filled videos and ridiculous demeanor, Greg’s Greek God Kinobody program has worked for me. Once you pay, you get the online program (which is pretty simple), access to the forum (can see tons of inspiring, crazy transformations and get quality advice from the other 10,000 plus users on the forum) and of course, loads of advertisements on his other products. I’d give it 4.5 starts if I could-it’s a little unorganized and the constant barrage of advertising is annoying but the results are hard to argue with. In the end, any program comes down to what you put into it. Nice thing about his stuff is the time commitment isn’t as intense as insanity, p90x, etc. and you get to eat what you want, just in moderation and at certain times of the day.
If you want to be successful with Kinobody, it’s important to understand how many calories you expend every day in the form of NEAT non-exercise activity thermogenesis energy. Since the Kinobody method centers around maintaining a neutral energy balance, if you expend too much NEAT non-exercise activity thermogenesis energy, you’ll need to eat more to make up for lost calories.
Most carbs you consume are broken down into sugar that enters the bloodstream. When you rein in carbohydrates on the keto diet, you have lower levels of blood glucose (high blood glucose can lead to diabetes). A study in the journal Nutrition reveals that a ketogenic diet improves blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetics more significantly than a low-calorie diet and can also decrease the dosage of your diabetes meds.
Still, it can be hard to get enough fat when you first start this diet. Butter, nuts, coconut and olive oils, and fatty cuts of meat are all on the menu. However, don't go overboard with polyunsaturated fats like soybean, corn, or sunflower oil. Keto dieters who increase their intake of those fats often end up with gastrointestinal distress that causes them to jump ship.
When it comes to starting the keto diet (or any diet for that matter), there's one thing all experts agree on. You *must* have a plan. "Never try to wing a keto diet," says Julie Stefanski, R.D.N., C.S.S.D., L.D.N., a dietitian based in York, PA, who specializes in the ketogenic diet. "Set a start date and get prepared by reorganizing your pantry, planning out meal and snack options, and purchasing appropriate foods and dietary supplements," she says. "The biggest reason people have a hard time sticking with keto is that people don't have enough interesting foods to turn to, and high-carb favorites win out over good intention. If you didn't buy foods at the grocery store that fit the guidelines, there won't be an easy option in the fridge when you really need it." (A great place to start is this List of High-Fat Keto Foods Anyone Can Add to Their Diet.)
In many developing countries, the ketogenic diet is expensive because dairy fats and meat are more expensive than grain, fruit and vegetables. The modified Atkins diet has been proposed as a lower-cost alternative for those countries; the slightly more expensive food bill can be offset by a reduction in pharmaceutical costs if the diet is successful. The modified Atkins diet is less complex to explain and prepare and requires less support from a dietitian.[55]
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