According to Obesity Research, there are plenty of benefits of intermittent fasting; but like any weight-loss strategy out there, not every plan is meant for everyone. Each individual is different and reacts differently to each diet, supplement or workout routine. Intermittent fasting is no different. Obviously, if you are already underweight or suffer from an eating disorder, you should avoid this strategy altogether.
Unfortunately, Sharp says that type of weight loss is not sustainable. “It’s largely water weight,” she says. “We store about six grams of water for every gram of carbohydrate, so when our carb stores are depleted, we drop a ton of water weight at once.” And if it’s increased energy you’re after, studies of cyclists and professional gymnasts have found no significant change to performance or muscle mass over several months of a ketogenic diet.

Whenever you work out, it’s important to allow ample time to recover. In fitness terms, recovery is the period in which you allow your body to heal and rest after you push it to the limits during a workout. However, recovery isn’t just about sitting on the couch and relaxing. In fact, Kinobody recommends that you engage in active recovery to get the most out of your workout.


O’Gallagher says you can lose body fat and gain muscle without the use of any mainstream diet programs. He doesn’t want to see you eating five to six small meals a day that leaves you unfulfilled and “weak.” It’s designed to allow you to eat anything you want -desserts and treats- and still lose body fat in the process. This diet is called Kinobody intermittent fasting, which is the backbone of this entire program.
It doesn’t only focus on your looks; it aims to help you build “incredible strength” as well – which is a nice bonus. This program promises that in just six short months, you will have the body you’ve always dreamed of. In this 8-phase workout program you will learn to lift for more muscle, overcome your plateaus and stay the course on your path to the perfect physique.
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