The keto diet is most assuredly not a fad, at least not in the usual sense of the word. It’s been around for nearly a century, and has its roots in the medical world: In the 1920s, epilepsy researchers found that increased levels of ketones in their patients resulted in fewer seizures, and the diet is still a widely accepted treatment for epilepsy today. There’s also some evidence that a ketogenic diet has therapeutic potential for a wide array of symptoms and diseases, including cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome, neurological conditions, diabetes, and even acne.

For breakfast, we are going to change it up a bit. Here’s where we introduce ketoproof coffee. Now, don’t get me wrong – I know some of you won’t like it. If you’re not a fan of coffee, then try it with tea. If you’re not a fan of the taste (which is very rare), then try making a mixture of the ingredients by themselves and eating it like that. So, why ketoproof coffee?
I have had my best workouts completely fasted! Once you adapt to training in the fasted state you get a boost of energy and strength. I think this goes back to stimulating the sympathetic system (fight or flight). In addition Fasted training has been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and improve nutrient partitioning. This means that your body will be more efficient at directing nutrients into muscle cells and away from fat stores. Thus training in the fasted state makes the subsequent meals more anabolic. This is why I absolutely love intermittent fasting for fat loss and building muscle. With that said pre- workout protein is beneficial at increasing protein synthesis, elevating metabolism and reducing muscle breakdown. Therefore I recommend 10 grams of BCAA before an intermittent fasting workout.
Let’s put it this way: as popular diets go, it doesn’t have a great track record. The Atkins diet, hugely popular in the early aughts, has since been proven more or less ineffective for significant weight loss. Researchers have found correlations between the Dukan diet — based on Pierre Dukan’s popular 2000 book The Dukan Diet, which, like Atkins and keto, used a list of 100 or so approved foods to put the body into a state of ketosis — and chronic kidney disease.
As long as you are in a calorie deficit then meal timing is irrelevant. In some cases large late night meals have been shown to preserve muscle mass better on a diet and result in a greater loss in body fat percentage. I highly recommend reading Martin Berkhan’s article on the subject – Is Late Night Eating Better for Fat loss and Health. Check out this post for more on the differences between the Kinobody approach and LeanGains (Martin Berkhan’s approach).
I have the same calories limit and macro. I easily stay within the limit but I completely stopped eating any type of bread, pasta, rice, potatoes and starchy food. I started using butter or coconut oil to cook and put mayo EVERYWHERE. It’s my new favourite topping for lettuce even XD. Then I eat plenty of eggs/meat/fatty fish and cheese. Olives are great as a snack. I cut out completely milk and use whipping cream instead. If you get into this completely counter intuitive way of thinking of food it’s super easy to get enough fat within the calorie limit.
Kinobody has a robust presence on social media. If you’re ever curious, Greg O’Gallagher keeps an active toll of his company’s social media numbers on the bottom of some of the pages on Kinobody’s official website. To give you a better idea of how to track Kinobody’s online following and learn everything you want to know about this company, here is a breakdown of this company’s social media presence:
The original method of pyramid training involves beginning your workout session by doing a large number of reps with relatively small weights. For instance, you could start with 15 reps with a 135-pound bench press. From there, you would add weight and do fewer reps, which might make your next step in the “pyramid” doing 12 reps with a 185-pound bench press. In this scheme, you would eventually culminate in a set of six rep at 265 pounds and then end your workout.
The original method of pyramid training involves beginning your workout session by doing a large number of reps with relatively small weights. For instance, you could start with 15 reps with a 135-pound bench press. From there, you would add weight and do fewer reps, which might make your next step in the “pyramid” doing 12 reps with a 185-pound bench press. In this scheme, you would eventually culminate in a set of six rep at 265 pounds and then end your workout.
We’re also going to keep it simple here. Most of the time, it’ll be salad and meat, slathered in high fat dressings and calling it a day. We don’t want to get too rowdy here. You can use leftover meat from previous nights or use easy accessible canned chicken/fish. If you do use canned meats, try to read the labels and get the one that uses the least (or no) additives!
Hello Myriam, I am a dual certified personal trainer and Sports Nutrition Specialist. I really love how concisely you have put this article together. I did notice that on your macro breakdown for a 1500 calorie diet you actually listed the protein intake at around 31% of the daily calories (117*4=468..468/1500=.31). I was wondering if you did this to bring the protein amount closer to 1 gram per pound of body-weight to preserve lean mass?
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